Aircraft Carrier Hms Furious (1917-48) P.1

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This again had the effect of consolidating human settlements, as the somewhat cooler and drier conditions were not as favorable for widespread agricultural production. Archaeological evidence suggests that, with the resettlement and expansion of cities, human cultures eventually developed more centralized (and often warring) societies. This marked the foundation of the first civilizations and empires. Mesopotamia, the Fertile Crescent between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, saw the development of the Sumer, Akkadian, Babylonian, and Assyrian empires.

At present, we are in the midst of a warming period in the seventh glacial-interglacial cycle during the last 650,000 years. The previous glacial period, from 90,000 to 10,000 years ago, led to glaciation across most of North America, reaching thicknesses of about 2 kilometers. In North America, these ice sheets are called the Laurentide and the Cordilleran and, in Europe, the Fennoscandian. ” The Holocene epoch has a number of points of interest that alert us to the fact that just as an ice age can have significant variations within it, so can an interglacial.

A number of prejudices and limits to scientific knowledge delayed serious consideration or acceptance of this interrelationship. For one thing, until the mid-20th century, it was thought by most archeologists, historians, and scientists that the Earth’s climate was relatively constant and stable (Linden, 4). Furthermore, historians and archaeologists tended to concentrate on political, social, and economic relations to explain the development of human communities. To such scholars, citing climate change (or climate variability) as a primary cause of change in human affairs ran the risk of offering a simplistic explanation for complex human relations.

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